Happiness: How to Know if the Next Job is For You

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Happiness how to know if the next job is for you

Don’t let your job stress you out…

Those of you who have had the privilege of job hunting will agree; job hunting isn’t as easy as it looks in the movies or is announced in mainstream media statistics. Looking for a new job often demands as much time as a full time job, and the paperwork required, the endless polite exchanges and the scrutinizing interviews can bury you, before the real work even starts.

Many people spend their lifetimes doing jobs that they hate no matter how they try to convince themselves otherwise. Many of us enter into boring corporate or dead end jobs telling ourselves that it is temporary but very soon it becomes the one constant in our lives and before we know it, we are permanently attached to it and completely detached from our real passions. Life is surely too precious to be wasted like this!

So next time you embark on a job hunt it would be useful to know how to choose a job made for you; a job worth doing without neglecting your happiness. View these pointers:

Working hours

Often jobs have a predetermined time slot but on entering them, we realize that the working hours are not at all what was set out initially. You’re called to your office at 9am in the morning on your day off or have to stay back till 10:30pm and sometimes you are called over on holidays. Yes, emergencies may happen but unless your job is your passion, make sure that it does not require you to always work past your paid and planned hours.

Salary

Let us all be real, if the pay is crappy on top of you not loving your job, the tap of happiness will be hard to turn on. Of course, not all paychecks are equal and your pay always depends on your position in your company’s hierarchy, however, if you are not paid fairly and in proportion to all the work that you put in, the job is not at all worth it.

Making an impact

How are you leaving a mark on the world with your job? It is important that the job you are doing, has a purpose, or else it gets very easy to become another pointless and unimportant cog in the large wheel of the corporate sector.

Colleagues

You can truly love your work only when you can relax and be yourself around your colleagues at work. A tense atmosphere with hostile co-workers will not benefit anybody and perhaps add to stress levels.

Priorities

At the end of the day, you will go back to your private life and not your job. No matter what, the outcome of a job always comes secondary to spending time around people who replenish your emotional well being and engage and stimulate your mind. Choose a job that does not include spending a large amount of your time away from dreaming and receiving love.

Creativity

Obviously finding a job that allows you to express your creativity, apply your ideas and vision whilst interacting with fellow thinkers, is easier said than done. Nonetheless, it is a sure way to be happy and such job exists, they are possible to find! Think and search outside the box…

Qualifications

Unfortunately however experienced or smart you think you are, there are rules. In a world where everyone is busy chasing time, no-one has time to wait for you to prove yourself on the job and instead you are expected to prove your credentials before you have even started it. Only one term matters for certain jobs; qualifications on paper. In order to sustain your happiness whilst working, you need to find a job that matches your qualifications. Or better still, invent the job that suits you and remember the jobs of the future have not been created yet.

Lastly, the stress, the right job might be hard work but it should not make you irritated or depressed. It should not have you dreading the day ahead every morning. Being anxious or stressed all the time doesn’t even help you perform better on the job. Whenever you have the opportunity to do so, always prioritize your happiness over your employment. If you don’t think there is an opportunity:

“Our most significant opportunities will be found in times of greatest difficulty.” Thomas S. Monson

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